Insider news & Analysis in Iran

Iranian regime, six powers start expert-level nuclear talks

(Reuters) - Iran and six world powers began an expert-level meeting about Tehran's nuclear programme on Thursday, part of efforts to reach an agreement by late July on how to resolve a decade-old dispute that has stirred fears of a Middle East war.

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Conflict between the Iraqi tribesmen with Malikis security forces entered its third day

Conflict between the Iraqi tribesmen with Malikis security forces that had broke out after the arrest of Dr. Ahmad Alalwani in Alanbar and other Provinces entered its third day.

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Iran: Fire festival, the festival of Iranians against fundamentalists and tyranny and reactions by the Iranian regime

Chaharshanbeh Souri
also called the fire festival, is an Iranian festival held the Tuesday night before the last Wednesday of the year. “Chaharshanbeh Souri” is formed the two words of Chaharshanbeh, or Wednesday, and Souri, meaning “red” and alluding to the redness of fire. This festival is a prelude to Nowruz that itself promises the spring and the novelty of nature (Nowruz, or the “New Day”, is the first day of spring and the Persian New Year).

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Outcome and Next Steps of the Iranian Nuclear Deal According to NCRI

The signing of the November 24, 2013 nuclear agreement in Geneva between the P5+1 and the Iranian regime is an important milestone.  Analysts have been busy assessing the deal considered by some as historic, and by others as an interim step.  Iran News Update (INU) was able to meet up with the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) to get there take on the recent developments.  INU shared a recap of the nuclear deal, below follows NCRI’s thoughts on the agreement and future steps. 

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Iraq: Execution-style killings signal return of Shiite death squads

United Press International BAGHDAD (UPI) -- The growing number of dead men found in the streets and canals of Baghdad, mostly shot in the head, some bearing the marks of torture, is stirring fears Shiite death squads who slaughtered hundreds, possibly thousands, of Sunnis during the dark days of Iraq's sectarian bloodbath are back in business. A few weeks ago, children playing in the eastern sector of the Iraqi capital discovered the corpses of 10 young men -- all shot in the head, blindfolded and handcuffed -- piled up in a room in an abandoned apartment block. Police reported they had no idea who was responsible for the slayings. Witnesses are rare. But amid a swelling al-Qaida insurgency in which the Sunni jihadists have systematically killed large numbers of Shiites, Iraq's majority sect, there are growing suspicions that the execution-style murders mark the return of Shiite assassination squads who terrorized the sprawling city of 7 million at the height of the sectarian war in 2004-07. One of the most bloodthirsty squads was led by a Shiite known as Abu Deraa, which means "Father of the Shield" in Arabic. At one time he was a commander in the Shiite militia known as the Mehdi Army, which was headed by a fiery cleric named Moqtada al-Sadr, who twice launched insurgencies against U.S. forces. Sadr, who has close links with Tehran, has renounced violent action but remains a rival of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, a Shiite first elected in 2005. Maliki's overwhelmingly Shiite security forces, which included many ex-militiamen, failed repeatedly to kill or capture Abu Deraa and other Shiite death squad chieftains whose victims were invariably Sunni. Indeed, they were widely believed to have turned a blind eye to his barbarous depredations. Most of his victims were tortured before being killed. Bodies were found left in the streets, on garbage dumps and in the city's canals, pierced by nails and bolts, or bored by hand-held power drills that became his gruesome trademark. In those days, the bodies of Abu Deraa's victims were usually dumped on a stretch of waste ground known as al-Saddeh on the outskirts of Sadr City, a vast Shiite suburb of Baghdad that was a Medi Army stronghold. It became known with macabre humor as ""Happiness Hotel." Abu Deraa disappeared in 2007. The Asharq al-Awasat newspaper reported then he'd fled to Iran because the Americans were getting too close. He was reported to have returned to Baghdad in summer 2010.
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Iran: The myth of moderation

By MOSA ZAHED, UPI Outside View Commentator   |   Oct. 28, 2013 

BRUSSELS, Oct. 28 (UPI) -- One month ago, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani addressed world leaders during the 68th session of the U.N. General Assembly in an attempt to cool tensions between Iran and the international community over its disputed nuclear program.

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Iran Breaking News - Protest gathering by families of political prisoners in front of Rouhani's office

 According to latest news from Iran, more than 100 families of political prisoners in Iran, in particular the families of Ward 350...

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