News : Nuclear

U.S. should be applauded for pulling out of nuclear deal

By INU Staff

INU - Donald Trump officially pulled out of the 2015 Iranian Nuclear Deal on Tuesday, attracting criticism from the other signatories to the deal. But the truth is that Trump should be celebrated for making the courageous decision to withdraw from a deal that was not in the national security interests of either the US or its allies in the Middle East.

No one wants Iran to have nuclear weapons. Anyone who advocated for that would be out of their minds. The Iranian Regime is the leading state sponsor of terrorism and they are certainly causing enough damage in the Middle East without any extra weaponry. This is why the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries cautiously supported the deal at first.

However, in the intervening years, it has become increasingly clear that the Iranian Regime has not been using the money gained from the deal (i.e. trade deals, unfrozen assets) to improve the lives of their people. Instead, the Regime has ploughed their money into regional conflicts, proxy groups, and terrorism, allowing them to cause chaos in the region.

While France, Germany, and the UK may not approve of Trump’s decision, they should consider how they would feel if their capital cities were often under attack by the Iranian Regime or its proxies. This is the reality for many Gulf states.

The Iran-backed Houthi militias in Yemen took the capital in 2014, scream “Death to America”, and consistently launch Iranian-made ballistic missiles at Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

And that’s just one of the Regime’s malign allies. They also support:
• Hezbollah in Lebanon, who are responsible for the 1983 bombing of a US barracks in Beirut
• Syrian President Bashar Assad, who uses chemical weapons against his own people
• Asaib Ahl Al-Haq in Iraq, who are responsible for the killing of many Americans, Britons and Iraqis
• Polisario separatist fighters in Western Sahara, which caused Morocco to cut ties with Iran

Faisal J. Abbas, the editor in chief of Arab News, wrote: “As such, instead of criticizing Drumpf, world powers need to unite and come up with either sanctions or a revised agreement that limits both Iran’s nuclear ambitions and its ability to cause mayhem. A 2.0 version of the nuclear deal would be more than welcome, particularly since in this case, no deal is far better than a bad one.”

Indeed, it would be much better to get a new unilateral deal that targeted the Iranian Regime for all of its malign activity, not just one element.