Iranian Workers in Mashhad Express Their Pains

Several citizens in Mashhad city blamed the Iranian regime for its mismanagement that pushed impoverished segments of the society to misery
Several citizens in Mashhad city blamed the Iranian regime for its mismanagement that pushed impoverished segments of the society to misery

They also expressed their dismay in the regime’s decision to provide a mere $62 loan with a 12-percent interest rate.

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“Mr. Rouhani vowed to offer a $62 loan as subsidy then he would take it back with 12 percent interest. What aid is it? You try to fool workers! The subsidy is not much, to begin with, and now you want to make a profit off of it? How can we stay at home and bear hunger? We have to come out to find a job or donations from the people,” a worker said.

Another worker complained about the dire conditions and constant unemployment, saying, “Over a month, I swear that I haven’t earned 1,000 tomans (6 cents).”

A worker also compared the current situation with several weeks ago. “Earlier, I managed to work three or four days a week. But I cannot find any job these days,” he stated.

Another worker said, “For 20 days, I haven’t found a job in this place. Everyone comes here to receive the livelihood basket; there is no job.”

A citizen in mid-age also explained, “Just think officials present $62 to a family for three months Can a worker supply his family with three children. Everyone loses his faith when he falls in poverty. Don’t we have families? Aren’t we human? How should we live under these conditions?”

He showed his anger against the regime’s horrible policies that resulted in worse conditions and livelihood for workers. “Previously, I had to pay 3,000 tomans in taxes; however, I was receiving 40,000 tomans as subsidies. For 12 years, the subsidies have remained fixed. In return, taxes and rents have crazily climbed. Who is calculating our expense? Which official is concerned about workers? Which official studies workers’ conditions?” he said.

“It is better than the coronavirus kills than to die of hunger,” he concluded.

“You’re embarrassed before your wife and children. What can you tell your family when you couldn’t find a job for four or five days? Can you say to your family that I didn’t work? You can say it one or two days, what about the next days?” another worker said.

A female street-seller who suffered severely from a physical disease blamed the regime’s officials for their incompetence and misogynistic measures. “Unfortunately, the government not only doesn’t care about our problems but also doesn’t allow us to make ends meet, I wish they did,” she said.

“Municipality says, ‘we have rent crossroads for $31,250 per month, and you have no right to work here,'” she added while had worn her face with a face mask. While her voice was breaking, she continued, “They say, ‘Ladies shouldn’t work.’ So, what should I do? While my hand, leg, and rib cage have broken, and I’m unable to do heavy works. I have to work for three or four hours to make ends meet.”

She also expressed that she had no other choice than selling on the street and said, “I’m not crazy, but I have to carry napkins with my broken hand. I sell two napkins for six-cent alone. How many should I sell to provide my costs? My daughter has dropped out of the university for two years.”

Another lady who makes ends meet by street-selling explained a part of her family’s problems: “I’m a street-seller, but I couldn’t go to market since the coronavirus emerged in the country. I was managing my life with street-selling. I live in a rented home. I have no one to support me.”

“For 13 years, my husband cannot work because of his hand problems. He suffers from spinal cord disease. I borrowed money to provide his medicine. I have two daughters. God knows that it is very hard. I know how people think about street-sellers. But because my husband, I have to street-sell to avoid begging,” she explained in a heartbreaking voice.

Notably, Iranian workers have to bear the dire economic conditions while financial institutions and giant holdings affiliated with the supreme leader Ali Khamenei occupy different sectors of Iran’s economy. However, these institutions prefer to spend the plundered wealth to fund their extremist proxies in the Middle East rather than aiding needy people inside the country.

 

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