Iran regime tested missile, breaching U.N. resolutions: U.S. officials

The Iranian regime has tested a new medium-range ballistic missile last month in a breach of two U.N. Security Council resolutions, Reuters reported quoting two U.S. officials on Monday.

The officials, both speaking on condition of anonymity, said the test was held on Nov. 21. One of them said the missile traveled within Iranian territory, the report said.

Under a 2010 Security Council resolution that remains valid until a nuclear deal between the Iranian regime and six world powers is implemented, all ballistic missile tests are banned.

Fox News reported that Western intelligence says the test was held Nov. 21 near Chabahar, a port city in southeast Iran’s Sistan and Baluchestan Province near the border with Pakistan. The launch took place from a known missile test site along the Gulf of Oman.

The missile, known as a Ghadr-110, has a range of 1,800 – 2000 km, or 1200 miles, and is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead. The missile fired in November is an improved version of the Shahab 3, and is similar to the precision guided missile tested by Iran on Oct. 10, which elicited strong condemnation from members of the U.N. Security Council.

“The United States is deeply concerned about Iran’s recent ballistic missile launch,” Samantha Power, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., said in a statement after the last Iranian ballistic missile test in October.

The missile, known as a Ghadr-110, has a range of 1,800 – 2000 km, or 1200 miles, and is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead. The missile fired in November is an improved version of the Shahab 3, and is similar to the precision guided missile tested by the Iranian regime on Oct. 10, which elicited strong condemnation from members of the U.N. Security Council.