Teachers Strike Across Iran in Line With the November Iran Protests

In the past year, Iranian teachers have held dozens of rallies to demand their rights along with other Iranians especially workers and government employees, who have protested economic woes, government corruption and lack of political freedom.

The teachers on strike protested the continuous inequality in paychecks and pensions for working and retired teachers and skyrocketing inflation. They also demanded the release of their imprisoned colleagues.

In another development, retirees from across the country gathered outside the regime’s Majlis (parliament) in Tehran on Monday in a protest that coincided with the teachers’ strike across Iran. The participants held signs reading, “People’s demands should not be responded to with bullets and imprisonment” and “We will continue our efforts until our demands are met.”

On Saturday, workers of the Fasa sugar cube factory in Fars Province, southern Iran, held a protest outside the local governor’s office for not receiving their wages during the past four months. They have also been deprived of their insurance pensions for the past three months.

Reports from Shahr-e Kord, Isfahan Province, indicate that employees of a local cement factory held a protest outside the factory on Saturday and demanded their delayed paychecks. They also protested the harsh working conditions. The regime’s Maskan (Housing) Foundation is the shareholder of this factory.

Also on Saturday, contract workers of the Hatami factory in the Chadormalu industrial complex of Yazd Province launched a strike and held a rally protesting the officials’ refusal to equalize working conditions.

In other reports, 23 employees of the Ghazvin steel factory have been laid off from work as their contracts came to an end on Saturday, December 21. Around 150 employees are working in this site and 23 have been laid off from work during the past month.

These protests and strikes are indeed the continuations of the November uprising that shook the Iranian regime in its entirety. Regime officials are voicing ongoing concerns in this regard. They say it is necessary to act to prevent any recurrence of the Iran protests.

The clerical regime ruling in Iran is incapable of solving people’s social problems and difficulties, especially economic problems. It seeks one way or another to prolong its life and preserve its rule. Therefore, the authorities are continuing to plunder and steal people’s property. A vast part of public assets and the country’s capital is used for the regime’s warmongering policies and funding terrorist proxies and continuing proxy wars in the region.

Versus this economic turmoil, Iranian people’s daily protests continue to spread across the country.